To Dial, Or Not To Dial…That Is The Question!

We live in an era where technology is full-steam ahead and constantly changing. We hear this from our clients throughout our work at Farland Group — that companies are in a game of cat-and-mouse to keep up with one another. Technology is the reason it’s so easy to open my email first thing in the morning and send that quick note to the assistant I’ve been chasing for two weeks.

But, sometimes it’s necessary to remind ourselves of the OG of technology — the desk phone!

Early on in my career, I thought that picking up the phone to schedule a meeting was a waste of time, because really, who does that anymore? Doesn’t everyone just use email and text messages to communicate? I quickly realized though, that this isn’t the case, and that good and fast results can and will happen by picking up the phone:

9 times out of 10…. I am no mathematician, but in my experience I have had great success with people either picking up the phone when I call, or they almost always send me a quick note letting me know they’ve listened to my voicemail. In the end, my questions are answered and actions on my daily list get checked off.

Agile ways and means…. Typing an email can be done quickly, but so can a phone call. In many instances if someone picks up on the other end of the line, I’m able to obtain results in just one interaction versus three that it might take through back and forth emails.

Personal touch is key…. A phone call can have a positive influence when cultivating relationships. Unlike an email, which can be overlooked and accidentally deleted, a phone call gives you the chance to explain in your own voice the reason for dialing. People appreciate that you’ve taken the time out of your day for that quick call.

This isn’t to say email is out of the question, but if you’re asking yourself whether to send a third follow up email or pick up and dial, the answer should always be to dial.

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